Category Archives: Construction


New Jersey Lien guidlines

In the state of New Jersey, liens filed on private property are known as mechanics’ liens . When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed with regard to work performed on privately owned property, it attaches to and encumbers the fee simple ownership of property. When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed on a public project, the lien attaches to and secures the funds in the public owner’s hands, prohibiting the owner from releasing that money until the mechanics lien is satisfied.
Contractors, subcontractors, sub-subcontractors, architects, engineers, and suppliers all have lien rights under New Jersey’s Construction Lien Law.

Pre-lien notice requirements exist for some lien claimants. Anyone that does not have a direct contract with the owner should file a Notice of Delivery of Materials and Services with the Owner and Prime Contractor within 20 days of starting work on the Project
New Jersey has different rules for different types of projects.

Construction Liens filed on commercial projects must be filed within 90 days after last day the claimant provided materials or labor to the Project. The filing of a Residential Lien Claim is a two step process. BOTH STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 120 DAYS. Within 60 days of the last furnishing of labor or materials, a lien claimant must file a Notice of Unpaid Balance along with a demand for arbitration. This arbitration has nothing to do with the litigation or resolution of the lien claimant’s underlying claim. It is solely for the purpose of determining whether the lien claimant has the right to file a lien claim. At the conclusion of the arbitration, the lien claimant may file a Construction Lien Claim for the sum of money determined by the arbitrator. Liens on public projects, also known as municipal mechanics’ liens , must be filed within 60 days of when the entire project is completed and accepted by resolution of the public agency. This differs from commercial and residential liens, which have time requirements starting when the work of the claimant, not the project, is completed.

For more information about New Jersey Liens, please visit LienItNow.

New Jersey Lien guidlines

In the state of New Jersey, liens filed on private property are known as mechanics’ liens . When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed with regard to work performed on privately owned property, it attaches to and encumbers the fee simple ownership of property. When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed on a public project, the lien attaches to and secures the funds in the public owner’s hands, prohibiting the owner from releasing that money until the mechanics lien is satisfied.
Contractors, subcontractors, sub-subcontractors, architects, engineers, and suppliers all have lien rights under New Jersey’s Construction Lien Law.

Pre-lien notice requirements exist for some lien claimants. Anyone that does not have a direct contract with the owner should file a Notice of Delivery of Materials and Services with the Owner and Prime Contractor within 20 days of starting work on the Project
New Jersey has different rules for different types of projects.

Construction Liens filed on commercial projects must be filed within 90 days after last day the claimant provided materials or labor to the Project. The filing of a Residential Lien Claim is a two step process. BOTH STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 120 DAYS. Within 60 days of the last furnishing of labor or materials, a lien claimant must file a Notice of Unpaid Balance along with a demand for arbitration. This arbitration has nothing to do with the litigation or resolution of the lien claimant’s underlying claim. It is solely for the purpose of determining whether the lien claimant has the right to file a lien claim. At the conclusion of the arbitration, the lien claimant may file a Construction Lien Claim for the sum of money determined by the arbitrator. Liens on public projects, also known as municipal mechanics’ liens , must be filed within 60 days of when the entire project is completed and accepted by resolution of the public agency. This differs from commercial and residential liens, which have time requirements starting when the work of the claimant, not the project, is completed.

For more information about New Jersey Liens, please visit LienItNow.

New Jersey Lien guidlines

In the state of New Jersey, liens filed on private property are known as mechanics’ liens . When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed with regard to work performed on privately owned property, it attaches to and encumbers the fee simple ownership of property. When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed on a public project, the lien attaches to and secures the funds in the public owner’s hands, prohibiting the owner from releasing that money until the mechanics lien is satisfied.
Contractors, subcontractors, sub-subcontractors, architects, engineers, and suppliers all have lien rights under New Jersey’s Construction Lien Law.

Pre-lien notice requirements exist for some lien claimants. Anyone that does not have a direct contract with the owner should file a Notice of Delivery of Materials and Services with the Owner and Prime Contractor within 20 days of starting work on the Project
New Jersey has different rules for different types of projects.

Construction Liens filed on commercial projects must be filed within 90 days after last day the claimant provided materials or labor to the Project. The filing of a Residential Lien Claim is a two step process. BOTH STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 120 DAYS. Within 60 days of the last furnishing of labor or materials, a lien claimant must file a Notice of Unpaid Balance along with a demand for arbitration. This arbitration has nothing to do with the litigation or resolution of the lien claimant’s underlying claim. It is solely for the purpose of determining whether the lien claimant has the right to file a lien claim. At the conclusion of the arbitration, the lien claimant may file a Construction Lien Claim for the sum of money determined by the arbitrator. Liens on public projects, also known as municipal mechanics’ liens , must be filed within 60 days of when the entire project is completed and accepted by resolution of the public agency. This differs from commercial and residential liens, which have time requirements starting when the work of the claimant, not the project, is completed.

For more information about New Jersey Liens, please visit LienItNow.

New Jersey Lien guidlines

In the state of New Jersey, liens filed on private property are known as mechanics’ liens . When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed with regard to work performed on privately owned property, it attaches to and encumbers the fee simple ownership of property. When a New Jersey mechanics lien is filed on a public project, the lien attaches to and secures the funds in the public owner’s hands, prohibiting the owner from releasing that money until the mechanics lien is satisfied.
Contractors, subcontractors, sub-subcontractors, architects, engineers, and suppliers all have lien rights under New Jersey’s Construction Lien Law.

Pre-lien notice requirements exist for some lien claimants. Anyone that does not have a direct contract with the owner should file a Notice of Delivery of Materials and Services with the Owner and Prime Contractor within 20 days of starting work on the Project
New Jersey has different rules for different types of projects.

Construction Liens filed on commercial projects must be filed within 90 days after last day the claimant provided materials or labor to the Project. The filing of a Residential Lien Claim is a two step process. BOTH STEPS MUST BE COMPLETED WITHIN 120 DAYS. Within 60 days of the last furnishing of labor or materials, a lien claimant must file a Notice of Unpaid Balance along with a demand for arbitration. This arbitration has nothing to do with the litigation or resolution of the lien claimant’s underlying claim. It is solely for the purpose of determining whether the lien claimant has the right to file a lien claim. At the conclusion of the arbitration, the lien claimant may file a Construction Lien Claim for the sum of money determined by the arbitrator. Liens on public projects, also known as municipal mechanics’ liens , must be filed within 60 days of when the entire project is completed and accepted by resolution of the public agency. This differs from commercial and residential liens, which have time requirements starting when the work of the claimant, not the project, is completed.

For more information about New Jersey Liens, please visit LienItNow.

New Construction for UT in Texas

According to The Daily Texan Online, new construction for a University in UT is underway.  The construction project is estimated to cost $334 million and is scheduled to conclude in May 2016.  The project consist of new research, educational and administrative buildings for the university. The main phase of the construction is the building of a new medical center for the universities first medical class.  Since the first medical class is coming in March of 2016, the construction is under time constraints. 

Normally the construction gets split into different linear portions, one building going up after the other.  Due to the time constraints, multiple portions of the project are to be worked on simultaneously.  This will constrict the flow of travel throughout the university, but is necessary for a timely completion.

New Kroger Store Approved in Memphis

According to Bizjournal, the Memphis Shelby Country Board of Adjustment gave the go-ahead for construction of a new store to begin at the location of Union Ave. in midtown for Kroger.  The old store will be demolished for parking to accompany the new store location. 

The design is being led by The Pickering Firm, which has done many of the designs for Kroger in the past.  The new location is said to be about 74,000 square feet in size.  The demolition of the old store should begin within the next month.

New Research on Apartment Development in Texas

According to GlobeST,  Dallas is notwithstanding a surge of new apartments that should be here by the end of the year.  Axiometrics, which is located in the local area, noted on Tuesday that the national rent growth grew slightly during the third quarter. 

Axiometrics did report concerns about oversupplying a metropolitan area due to new deliveries increasing greater than the demand or job growth.  Although, throughout 2013, the new apartments are expected to be developed in a more broad fashion and help encompass a more established suburban region.

According to the research firm, predictions have been made saying that investors and developers will show a reduced rate of development until they see new supply consumed by the market.

To read more about this topic, visit GlobeST.

Boost for Single-Family Homes by U.S. Builders

According to ABC News, work on single-family homes by U.S. builders were at a high from 6 months ago during the month of August.  Not only was the present construction work high during August, but permits were also requested by the workers for even more future builds for the months ahead, despite higher mortgage rates.  

The building of houses and apartments were built at an annual rate of 891,000 last month, which rose from a 883,000 from the previous month. 

Mortgage rates could rise even more depending on what the Federal Reserve decides on its $85 billion a month bond purchase, which is meant to help keep long-term rates low. 

To read more on this topic, visit ABC News.

US Home Indusrty

According to BBC, the US home-building industry grew in the month of July, in part due to the increase of construction for new apartments. 
 
According to the Commerce Department, the new-home industry rose by 5.9 percent since the previous month. 
 
New homes grew at an annual rate of 896,000, which was below the rate for March that had a rate of 1 million. 
 
Mortgage rates could be rising due to a recent drop in new single-family homes built.  The new single-family home construction dropped by 2.2 percent.

Permits to build new homes have begun to rise, which recently showed an increase of 2.7 percent.  Also, 30-year mortgage rates have increased by a full percentage in July since it was at 3.4 percent in the month of May.

 
 

Idaho Mechanic’s Lien

In Idaho, liens filed on private property or on funds relating to a public project are known as Mechanic’s Liens. When an Idaho mechanics lien is filed with regard to work performed on privately owned property, it attaches to and encumbers the fee simple ownership of property.

Contractors, as well as subcontractors, design professionals, sub-subcontractors and material suppliers can file an Idaho mechanics lien. Suppliers to suppliers cannot file Idaho construction lien claims.
The filing of an Idaho construction lien must be completed within ninety days after the completion of the labor or services or furnishing of materials, or the cessation of the labor, services or furnishing of materials for any cause.

 In Idaho, oral contracts are sufficient if you have sufficient documentation to show the existence of an agreement or that you performed the work for which you are filing a construction lien.